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31 Jul 2011 652 views
 
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WaLL|

WaLL

WaLL

O.E. weall  "rampart" (natural as well as man-made), also "defensive fortification around a city, side of a building, interior partition," an Anglo-Frisian and Saxon borrowing (cf. O.S., O.Fris., M.L.G., M.Du. wal ) from L. vallum  "wall, rampart, row or line of stakes," apparently a collective form of vallus  "stake." Swed. vall , Dan. val  are from Low Ger. In this case, Eng. uses one word where many languages have two, e.g. Ger. Mauer  "outer wall of a town, fortress, etc.," used also in ref. to the former Berlin Wall, and wand  "partition wall within a building" (cf. the distinction, not always rigorously kept, in It. muro/parete , Ir. mur/fraig , Lith. muras/siena , etc.). The verb meaning "to enclose in a wall" is late O.E. *weallian . Wallpaper  is attested from 1827. Phrase up the wall  "angry, crazy" is from 1951; off the wall  "unorthodox, unconventional" is recorded from 1966, Amer.Eng. student slang. Wall-to-wall  (adj.) recorded 1953, of carpeting; metaphoric use (usually disparaging) is from 1967.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

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camera Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed 1/50s
aperture f/4.0
sensitivity ISO500
focal length 17.0mm
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